For Providers

Focus on Recovery – Spokane Regional Opioid Task Force

Discovering the mechanisms by which a complementary approach exerts its effects could help in the design of better treatments and predict which people are most likely to respond. Although there is great need for additional research, there are some preliminary studies and best practice guidelines to support patient pain management.

Find Treatment Providers

Washington Recovery Helpline 

The Washington Recovery Help Line is a program of Crisis Connections. They offer an anonymous, confidential 24-hour help line for Washington State residents experiencing substance use disorder, problem gambling, and/or a mental health challenge. They can also connect callers with local treatment resources or more community services. To contact WA Recovery Helpline, call 1-866-789-1511.

Medication plays a critical role in the treatment of Substance Use Disorder (SUD).  When combined with counseling and/or behavioral therapies the potential for long term recovery greatly increases.  Over the course of this year alone, the Washington State Recovery Help Line has connected with 875 Spokane area residents, providing referrals to treatment and recovery services.  They have created an online search tool, Medication for Opioid Use Disorder (MOUD) locator,  to help connect individuals to waivered nurses and physicians that treat opioid use disorder. 

Pain Research

Discovering the mechanisms by which a complementary approach exerts its effects could help in the design of better treatments and predict which people are most likely to respond. Although there is great need for additional research, there are some preliminary studies and best practice guidelines to support patient pain management.

 

Peer Support

Two resources that connect providers with peers to discuss treating patients with OUD and/or chronic pain and a best practice guide for pain management. 

Guidelines

Access Washington State’s 2019 prescribing guideline toolkits for different provider types, tapering guidelines for opioids and Benzodiazepine, and pain management guidelines. 

 

Downloadable Resources

Downloadable files are available for the general public, for providers, patients, parents, and teens. Data fact sheets, and downloadable files on what to do with unused medications are also available. 

 

What is MAT?

MAT is Medication Assisted Treatment. Methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone are Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved medications often combined with behavioral therapies to treat Opioid Use Disorder. They are used to treat those who have an addiction to short-acting opioids such as heroin, morphine, and codeine, as well as semi-synthetic opioids like oxycodone and hydrocodone. Medications used in this type of treatment normalizes brain chemistry and body functions without the negative effect. This stability allows MAT patients to achieve healthy social, psychological and lifestyle changes. It decreases overdoses, increases the likelihood that someone will stay in treatment even through relapse, is more effective in reducing illicit opioid drug use that non-pharmacological treatments, and improves health treatment in other areas as well. For example, a person using MAT is more likely to enroll in HIV treatment and keep up their HIV treatments. People may safely take medications used in MAT for months, years, several years, or even a lifetime. Plans to stop a medication must always be discussed with a doctor.

How MAT can help

Opioid tolerance, dependence, and addiction are all manifestations of brain changes resulting from chronic opioid abuse. People struggling with OUD are in great part a struggling to overcome the effects of these changes. Medications such as methadone, LAAM, buprenorphine, and naltrexone act on the same brain structures and processes as addictive opioids, but with protective or normalizing effects.

A common misconception associated with MAT is that it substitutes one drug for another. Instead, these medications relieve the withdrawal symptoms and psychological cravings that cause chemical imbalances in the body. MAT programs provide a safe and controlled level of medication to overcome the use of an abused opioid. And research has shown that when provided at the proper dose, medications used in MAT have no adverse effects on a person’s intelligence, mental capability, physical functioning, or employability.

If you are a provider interested in being able to prescribe MAT, click the link to learn about trainings near you.

Provider Education

Treatment of OUD Course 8-Hour e-learning Waiver Course

Provided by the American Society of Addiction Medicine

This course provides 8 hours of education needed for physicians  to receive a waiver to prescribe buprenorphine in an office-based setting. More information on waiver requirements can be found on the SAMHSA website.

Access the course here

For information about additional Treatment of OUD courses, or to apply for a waiver, visit here 

A Waiver Training

Additional trainings will be posted as they become available

Spokane Focused On…

Treatment

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